Alabama Pastors Show Politics Trumps Faith

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You’d think evangelical leaders in Alabama would be brandishing their 10-foot poles in order to distance themselves from the child molesting Republican candidate Roy Moore in the race for the U.S. Senate. You’d be wrong.

David Floyd, for instance, pastor of Mervyn Parkway Baptist Church, rationalized that “all of us have sinned and need a savior” in his statement defending Moore. “I’ve prayed with him. I know his heart.” (“On morality, evangelicals get religion,” Chicago Tribune, Nov. 19, 2017) Of course, Floyd was not so forgiving of President Bill Clinton back in 1998 when he told church members that Clinton had to go because of his sexual dalliances. Apparently Floyd is confusing himself with Jesus because he believes he has the right to judge who is morally worthy and who is not.

Moore himself brandished a list of 50 Alabama Christian pastors who still support him despite the growing number of women who say Moore made sexual advances upon them when they were teenagers.

What is happening here? The answer lies in an “end justifies the means” attitude that many Christians took to the polls with them to elect Donald Trump in 2016. Because Trump said all the right things about abortion, he passed the evangelical litmus test for office. Since his election, he has cemented evangelical support by appointing a conservative justice of the Supreme Court and coming out against transgender individuals in the armed forces .

With reference to Moore, evangelicals see him as a man who “hold[s] positions close to ours.” (Tribune) So they give him a pass on behavior that does not even meet legal standards, never mind moral ones. As evangelical professor John Fea states, “What you’re seeing here is rank hypocrisy. These are evangelicals who have decided that the way to win the culture is now uncoupled from character.” (Tribune)

But the hypocrisy goes deeper than that. Evangelical Christians also tend to be politically conservative in other ways, and so this latest instance of propping up a morally corrupt leader serves to advance the conservative agenda on other issues, such as taxes and immigration. Proof of this is something Pastor Robert Jeffress of Dallas First Baptist Church reminds us.

Said Jeffress, “A watershed moment was 1980. Evangelical Christians chose between a born-again Baptist Sunday school teacher and a twice-married Hollywood actor who had signed the most liberal abortion bill and whose wife practiced astrology. And evangelicals chose Ronald Reagan over Jimmy Carter.” (Tribune)

It’s clear that Roy Moore has no intention of stepping away from the Senate race in Alabama. And although many evangelical leaders there have denounced his candidacy, many others justify their support in this hypocritical manner. Whatever happens in Alabama, this abdication of moral authority will ultimately backfire on religious leaders, especially with the next generation, whose hypocrisy radar is often quite high.

But the American people may ultimately pay too high a price if we continue to choose politics over character in our leaders.

 

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Hidden v. Overt Racism

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I prefer a Richard Spencer to a Donald Trump. Richard Spencer is the white nationalist whose recent appearance at the University of Florida created a security nightmare for the university and prompted Florida governor Rick Scott to declare a state of emergency. Spencer was basically shouted down by a preponderance of protesters who object to his overt racism.

Spencer’s stated goal is the creation of a “white ethno-state” in America. (“His Kampf,” Graeme Wood, Atlantic Monthly, June, 2017) In his now infamous “Hail Trump” speech, Spencer stated:

To be white is to be a striver, a crusader, an explorer and a conqueror. We build, we produce, we go upward … For us, it is conquer or die. This is a unique burden for the white man …. We were not meant to beg for moral validation from some of the most despicable creatures to ever populate the planet.

Spencer also supports abortion rights because it will reduce the number of nonwhites in the world, who are, according to him, too stupid to use birth control.

There is nothing subtle or open to interpretation here. Thus, as hateful and disgusting as Spencer and his ideology are, it is easy to counter and criticize them.

On the other hand, our president is (only slightly )more subtle. Trump ridicules Gold Star families, but only when they’re brown. Trump throws paper towels at hurricane victims and minimizes their suffering, but only when they’re brown. Trump calls peaceful protesters “sons of bitches,” but only when they’re brown. In each case, he and his supporters can declare that they are misunderstood or that the media is lying about Trump’s behavior. They can couch his casual racism in vague concepts of patriotism.

I’m not saying that the beliefs of neo-Nazis like Richard Spencer aren’t dangerous. But they are clear cut. We know what we are dealing with and fighting against. Much more difficult is the implied bigotry underlying Donald Trump’s words and actions as president. His hollow embrace of the American flag masks his assault on the American values of liberty and equality for all.

 

The World in Black and White

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When I was about 9 years old, our family got our first color television set. It was a wonder to us and a plague to my father, who spent endless hours trying to get the color adjusted properly. People on early TV shows always looked orange or green, it seemed, but it was exciting to see the television world full of color. It was like that moment when Dorothy gets deposited in Oz, and she steps out into a new and beautiful world.

The advent of color TV coincided with a flowering of expression and political activism in the United States. The civil rights movement had given birth to the Civil Rights Act of 1965, the beginning of a larger push toward affording blacks equal rights to whites. Growing unrest over US involvement in the Vietnam War led to protests and violent clashes with police. The late Sixties was the time of hippies, free love, and drug experimentation. Many in America, youth in particular, rebelled against the homogeneity and conservatism of the 1950s.

The Fifties were a prosperous time for many, and after the deprivations of the Great Depression and the horrors of World War II, Americans naturally craved comfort and security. The problem was that nonconformity was frowned upon, and prosperity and security remained elusive for blacks. So although some of the unrest and unruliness of the Sixties was negative, overall the era brought about progress for women and minorities.

Trump’s America seems to be a return to black and white. So much of his political platform and presidential agenda are designed to turn back the clock on civil rights, reproductive freedom, and freedom of expression. During the campaign, for instance, he called nonwhite immigrants criminals, rapists, and terrorists. He questioned the validity of Barack Obama’s U.S. birth certificate until late in the campaign. He said that women who had abortions should be punished and bragged about grabbing women’s genitals against their will. This was dismissed by his supporters as “locker room talk.” It seemed clear to those not dazzled by his reality TV fame that his slogan “Make America Great Again” really meant “Make America White Again.”

As president, Trump has put his reactionary views into action – decreeing a de facto travel ban on foreign Muslims, appointing an anti-civil rights attorney general, removing the contraceptive mandate from Obamacare, calling for a ban on transgender individuals in the military. He has made both veiled and overt threats against press freedom and taken exception to NFL players taking a knee during the national anthem. He has called these peaceful protestors “sons of bitches” while refusing to condemn white nationalists marching in Charlottesville and shouting slogans such as “Jews will not replace us.”

Seeing things in black and white is an apt metaphor for both the conformist Fifties and today’s politically polarized environment. It is incredibly depressing to see the hard-fought gains of the Sixties and Seventies being undone by the current administration with the complicity of the Republican-dominated Congress. I can only hope that the many Americans who have grown to love a world of color will rise up and demand that our country move forward, not backward, in the advancement of freedom and human rights.

Why Trump’s Words Matter

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At a press conference in Puerto Rico, where President Donald Trump had flown to view the devastation first hand, Trump made a lame joke about the island’s recovery wrecking the federal budget. Along with his remarks about Hurricane Maria not causing as many deaths as did Katrina in Louisiana over a decade ago, the president’s remarks were criticized as callous and unpresidential.

It may seem picayune to quibble about every word that comes out of the president’s mouth. Indeed, many conservatives paint Trump as a “can’t win for losing” figure. His off the cuff manner and refusal to keep his less seemly thoughts to himself actually appealed to many voters during the campaign. But now that he is president, Trump needs to mind his words. As the leader of the United States, he has the responsibility to understand that what he says has the power to hurt or heal our nation.

Most of Trump’s remarks concerning the devastating aftermath of Maria on the island of Puerto Rico consisted of his praising his own administration and, by extension, himself for their handling of the crisis. More ominously, any criticism of that response, such as the impassioned outcry from San Juan mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz, was met with denunciation by Trump and the usual accusations of fake news leveled at the mainstream media. In other words, if you don’t prostrate yourself in homage to Trump and his administration, Trump will attack and attempt to discredit you. These are the actions of petty tyrants, not democratically elected presidents.

I have a Facebook friend who relentlessly attacks the mainstream media as being completely false and lying about Trump whenever anything negative is reported about his words or actions. This attitude is the direct result of a relentless campaign to preemptively discredit any negative news or opinions about our president. Again, I would expect this kind of tactic in an autocracy, but not in our country.

Donald Trump does not have to be the most polished speaker. I don’t care if his vocabulary is less than professorial. But Trump’s Twitter attacks, his callous remarks, and his constant insistence on praising himself are indicative of the kind of man we have elected to lead our country. His words do matter. And I shudder to imagine what he will say in Las Vegas.

Thank You, President Trump

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Dear President Trump,

On behalf of a divided nation, thank you. Your insensitive and thinly veiled racist jabs at Colin Kaepernick and other black NFL players has had some beautiful unintended consequences.

Prior to your latest childish and angry tweet, wherein you called peaceful protesters “sons of bitches,” a few NFL players had been taking a stand (so to speak) by taking a knee during the national anthem at the start of games. Since your remarks, entire teams of NFL players, such as the Pittsburgh Steelers, have chosen to remain off the field rather  than salute a flag that stands for freedoms they find far too elusive. More and more players have chosen this dignified and nonviolent method of protesting police brutality and institutional racism. So rather than do away with the practice, your hateful comments have created a tidal wave.

Another unintended consequence of your hate-spewing bile is that you have fostered unity among players, coaches, and others who support their teammates in their struggles to right injustice. Last night at the Dallas Cowboys game, the entire team including the coach took a knee to make such a statement of solidarity. Then they stood, arms locked together, during the anthem. All of this had been agreed upon beforehand in conversations that may never have taken place had you not had one of your Twitter tantrums.

I have also noticed people who are not particularly political taking a stand – whether prominent celebrities or just Facebook friends who are fed up with the hatred and casual racism that has been growing like a cancer since you took office. Their courage to speak out gives me great hope in our future. It gives me hope that your election was an aberration and that people of good will can bring some sanity and dignity back to our great nation.

I pray that this movement continues to grow and that it forces local and state governments to take action against police brutality and other forms of institutional racism in this country. I pray that it is not just a blip on the screens of our lives. I pray that it energizes a new civil rights era and moves us away from division and hate and towards unity and equality for all.

I’m Disappointed

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I’m disappointed that Hillary Clinton recently came out of virtual seclusion to hawk her book rather than to lead the resistance against the Trump Administration.

I’m disappointed that President Trump treated an appearance at the site of massive flooding in Texas as another campaign rally: “Look at the crowd; look at the turnout.”

I’m disappointed that petty Americans are spending their time criticizing Melania’s choice of footwear.

I’m disappointed that Berkley antifascist groups used violence to counter a white supremacist march.

I’m disappointed that deniers refuse to concede that climate change might possibly have something to do with the heaviest amount of rainfall ever to fall on the 48 contiguous states.

I’m disappointed that even a natural disaster like Hurricane Harvey can’t seem to bring our country together.

Life is just full of disappointments. And yet . . .

Online and on TV, I am seeing first responders and volunteers helping residents of Texas escape the floodwaters. Everywhere from furniture stores to churches are opening their doors to shelter the displaced. In my home town, residents are making plans to collect needed supplies and drive them down to the Houston area. Donations are pouring into relief agencies.

The innate goodness in people seems to be taking over. I am going to choose to ignore the hate and snark and acrimony that is ever present on the internet these days, find out how best to help others, and go do something.

 

Is Trump a Racist?

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birthertoon10It seems a pretty open and shut case when answering the question: Is Donald Trump racist? He began his political career, after all, by questioning whether Barack Obama was actually born in Kenya, not Hawaii. His dog whistle campaign to “Make America Great Again” was seen by and large as code for “Make America White Again.” And let’s not forget his references to Hispanic immigrants as rapists and “bad hombres,” not to mention his repeated vilification of Muslims as terrorists.

Since taking office, Donald Trump has only solidified his white supremacist “street cred” by appointing such figures as Steve Bannon as White House strategist and Jeff Sessions, a man condemned by civil rights groups, as attorney general. One of Trump’s first executive orders was to ban residents from 7 Muslim-majority nations from entering the United States. He has increased the detainment of illegal immigrants. He has formed the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, a thinly disguised vehicle for enhancing voter suppression in minority areas. And, of course, he refused to condemn white supremacists for their brazen and violent demonstration at the University of Virginia. Instead, he spoke of the violence “on many sides,” as if calling out bigots and neo-Nazis for the despicable creatures they are is somehow wrong.

Yes, there’s plenty of evidence to conclude that Donald Trump holds racist views. But what if he doesn’t? What if he really doesn’t believe any of the hateful things he’s been spewing since he set his eyes on the prize of the presidency? In a way, that would be worse. It would mean that Trump is cynically stirring up bigotry and hate only to gain and hold onto power. The ruthlessness of a man who believes in nothing except his own financial gain and self-aggrandizement should take our breath away.

Yet White House officials are standing behind the president and making excuses for Trump’s failure to call white supremacists by name. Why won’t Donald Trump excoriate such hate? Well, he’s already raising money for his re-election campaign. He needs those disgruntled whites who blame all of their failures on non-whites in order to win another term. Are we horrified enough yet?