I’m Disappointed

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I’m disappointed that Hillary Clinton recently came out of virtual seclusion to hawk her book rather than to lead the resistance against the Trump Administration.

I’m disappointed that President Trump treated an appearance at the site of massive flooding in Texas as another campaign rally: “Look at the crowd; look at the turnout.”

I’m disappointed that petty Americans are spending their time criticizing Melania’s choice of footwear.

I’m disappointed that Berkley antifascist groups used violence to counter a white supremacist march.

I’m disappointed that deniers refuse to concede that climate change might possibly have something to do with the heaviest amount of rainfall ever to fall on the 48 contiguous states.

I’m disappointed that even a natural disaster like Hurricane Harvey can’t seem to bring our country together.

Life is just full of disappointments. And yet . . .

Online and on TV, I am seeing first responders and volunteers helping residents of Texas escape the floodwaters. Everywhere from furniture stores to churches are opening their doors to shelter the displaced. In my home town, residents are making plans to collect needed supplies and drive them down to the Houston area. Donations are pouring into relief agencies.

The innate goodness in people seems to be taking over. I am going to choose to ignore the hate and snark and acrimony that is ever present on the internet these days, find out how best to help others, and go do something.

 

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Taming Political Discourse

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When I first heard that ESPN had asked a reporter not to cover a UVA game because his name is Robert Lee, I’ll admit I found the decision utterly ridiculous. But I was loath to admit it out loud. Why? Because I knew the incident would be trotted out endlessly on every Fox News show and by every right wing politician trying to discredit liberalism.

Such is the state of public discourse today. Non-stop news coverage, political blogs, and social media have made communication a polarizing and fraught enterprise. The brouhaha about Confederate statues is a case in point.

There are legitimate reasons for citizens to call for the removal of statues glorifying the era of the Confederacy, a secessionist movement that amounted to rebellion against the United States. Despite what many Southerners see as an assault on their heritage, there is no denying that Confederate leaders stood for the preservation of slavery and used that cause to motivate Southern forces to fight the North.

On the other hand, there are arguments to be made about keeping the statues, and from my point of view, the biggest argument in favor of leaving statues alone is that we have much bigger fish to fry when it comes to racial justice. Furthermore, the threat of removing them has given white supremacists a cause to rally around, bringing them out en masse with sometimes devastating results.

On the Right, of course, pundits and politicians wonder aloud if it’s a slippery slope from removing Robert E. Lee to getting rid of George Washington or Thomas Jefferson. They ridicule calls for defunding the Jefferson Memorial or removing Confederate statues from the Capitol building. Some rightly point out that many Southern Democrats were themselves segregationists back in the day.

This whole issue makes my head hurt. And I feel that it’s a distraction from policy-making in Washington. Republicans have been trying to do serious damage to social entitlement programs. Our president keeps threatening new countries with military action. The Trump Administration is dialing back progress on the environment by refusing to admit to the realities of climate change and by encouraging the revival of such destructive practices as coal mining.

Let’s get back to discussing these important issues in a reasonable and respectful way so that positive change can be made in our society.

Is Trump a Racist?

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birthertoon10It seems a pretty open and shut case when answering the question: Is Donald Trump racist? He began his political career, after all, by questioning whether Barack Obama was actually born in Kenya, not Hawaii. His dog whistle campaign to “Make America Great Again” was seen by and large as code for “Make America White Again.” And let’s not forget his references to Hispanic immigrants as rapists and “bad hombres,” not to mention his repeated vilification of Muslims as terrorists.

Since taking office, Donald Trump has only solidified his white supremacist “street cred” by appointing such figures as Steve Bannon as White House strategist and Jeff Sessions, a man condemned by civil rights groups, as attorney general. One of Trump’s first executive orders was to ban residents from 7 Muslim-majority nations from entering the United States. He has increased the detainment of illegal immigrants. He has formed the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, a thinly disguised vehicle for enhancing voter suppression in minority areas. And, of course, he refused to condemn white supremacists for their brazen and violent demonstration at the University of Virginia. Instead, he spoke of the violence “on many sides,” as if calling out bigots and neo-Nazis for the despicable creatures they are is somehow wrong.

Yes, there’s plenty of evidence to conclude that Donald Trump holds racist views. But what if he doesn’t? What if he really doesn’t believe any of the hateful things he’s been spewing since he set his eyes on the prize of the presidency? In a way, that would be worse. It would mean that Trump is cynically stirring up bigotry and hate only to gain and hold onto power. The ruthlessness of a man who believes in nothing except his own financial gain and self-aggrandizement should take our breath away.

Yet White House officials are standing behind the president and making excuses for Trump’s failure to call white supremacists by name. Why won’t Donald Trump excoriate such hate? Well, he’s already raising money for his re-election campaign. He needs those disgruntled whites who blame all of their failures on non-whites in order to win another term. Are we horrified enough yet?

 

“Frankenstein” Republicans Losing Control of Their Monster

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Earlier this week I wrote a tongue-in-cheek post about choosing a president via reality TV. Ironically, the White House itself resembles the cast of The Apprentice these days.

Trump’s newly appointed communications director Anthony Scaramucci has gone rabid, claiming the White House, like a fish, “stinks from the head down,” a reference to White House chief of staff Reince Priebus. Scaramucci, acting like an extra on The Sopranos, has vowed to fire the entire communications staff in order to stem the tide of leaks from disgruntled White House employees. (Chicago Tribune, July 28, 2017)

Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders claims the Donald likes pitting his employees against each other, a fact confirmed by former employees of the Trump organization. (Tribune, July 28, 2017) I half expect to see the president on TV, sitting behind his desk in the Oval Office and shouting, “You’re fired!” at Priebus, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, and special prosecutor Robert Mueller.

Things in Washington have clearly gotten out of control. Donald Trump’s insulting tweets about Sessions and threats to fire Mueller have been met with dismay by Congressional Republicans, who have issued stern warnings to Trump not to remove either man from his post. But that’s a little like expecting the pit bull in your backyard to play nice when you’ve trained it to be a killer.

In a week when the President of the United States managed to politicize a Boy Scout Jamboree, offend the LGBT community, and appear at yet another self-aggrandizing rally in Ohio, it is hard to see how the party that unleashed the Trumpian monster will be able to rein him in.

Trump actually managed to do something positive this week, and that was to bring jobs into Wisconsin by way of a deal with electronics company Foxconn. (We’ll ignore the inconvenient fact that the supposedly saved jobs at Carrier in Indiana are going away.) Yet the behavior of both the president and his minions has overshadowed any good news coming from the White House.

Meanwhile, many Republican leaders are experiencing buyers’ remorse about supporting a president who has turned out to be a loose cannon they can’t control.

If ever there were a time for Republicans to reach across the aisle and unite with Democrats to do something about Frankenstein’s monster, that time is now.

Big Brother: Presidential Edition

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reality_tv_collageBased upon the most recent presidential election, it’s clear to me that the American electorate needs more entertainment value in its politics. Therefore, I propose we run future elections like a reality TV contest.

We could, for instance, model our presidential race on the granddaddy of all reality shows, Survivor. Democrats and Republicans could form two tribes of presidential hopefuls who would be forced to compete on a remote island wearing nothing but loincloth, eating gross food, and completing arduous tasks until the fittest survived.

The refreshing part of a Survivor– style competition would be that all the political machinations and back- stabbing would be in the open for a change.

Or maybe the campaign could be run like The Amazing Race. Here we’d have pairs of candidates running around the country completing challenges such as stomaching the horrible food at various state fairs and pretending to love it. (Actually, this is pretty much what our current candidates do.)

The first pair on The Amazing Presidential Race to get to the winning destination would become our next President  and Vice President.

But I think the most entertaining way to choose a president would be to subject them to a Bachelor/Bachelorette type of contest. Each week we would select random citizens to be wooed in hot tubs by the scantily clad presidential hopefuls. Each week an unlucky candidate would get a rose and be unceremoniously shown the door.

We might not get a smart or capable president, but at least we’d get some eye candy to cheer us up.

So who’s with me? Is it time to give up the idea that a sober, thoughtful, and qualified individual is the best choice to be leader of the free world? Hasn’t the U.S. electorate shown itself to be more interested in a person of the caliber to be seen on The Real World?

At this point I’d settle for a contest resembling the old game show To Tell the Truth. 

The New Republicans: Pitbulls in Lipstick

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I haven’t missed Sarah Palin. Seeing her on TV news today in response to word that her former running mate John McCain has brain cancer was an unwelcome reminder of her existence.

As I listened to her speak, I was reminded of her coarseness, her lack of knowledge, and her family drama that rivals anything seen in an episode of Jerry Springer. And it hit me: Sarah Palin helped usher in the era of politics as reality TV.

Her famous comment about hockey moms as “pit bulls in lipstick” was eaten up by a certain segment of the American electorate, and the Republican Party took note.

Of course, we have seen an intertwining of politics and entertainment in the past. Our rash of “celebrity” governors – Ronald Reagan, Jesse Ventura, Arnold Schwarzenegger – has contributed to the idea that one need not have stellar credentials to be elected to high office.

And the entertainment-oriented nature of the news media has not helped. It was a sad state of affairs when a comedy show, The Daily Show, was considered by many to be a better source of news than any of the network or cable news programs. Daily Show host Jon Stewart was even encouraged to run for office.

But the Trump campaign took politics to a completely new – and unfortunately low – level. He initially sparked interest because of his larger than life persona and celebrity due to the reality show The Apprentice. Once news outlets saw how crowds were eating up his crude and outrageous statements, they started covering Trump’s campaign slavishly.

It is depressing to me that a sizable number of Americans were willing to elect as president a reality show star with no political experience and questionable business dealings who routinely puts down women, immigrants, war heroes, and the disabled. Yet a recent report indicates that despite all the apparent conflicts of interest, possible collusion with the Russian government, and a petty penchant for tweeting insults and threats to those who oppose him, Donald Trump’s fans continue to support him and to delight in his boorish behavior.

This is not simply the dumbing down of American politics but the lowering of standards of acceptable behavior for no less than the President of the United States.

Far from making America great again, our 45th president is managing to make America mean.

 

 

 

 

America the Beautiful

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At Sunday Mass, our closing hymn was “America the Beautiful.” It is by far my favorite patriotic song, and like many people, I think it should be our national anthem.

As we sang the familiar hymn, I really paid attention to the words in the song, and some of them particularly struck me in light of our current political climate.

“God mend thine ev’ry flaw.” We Americans certainly have our share of these. Yet we look to our system of government to right every wrong, address every injustice. It’s a lot for our Constitution to live up to. Americans on both sides of the political aisle disagree as to what those fundamental rights, freedoms, and privileges should look like. The song goes on, “Confirm thy soul in self-control,/Thy liberty in law.” Americans everywhere would do well to remember the limits we impose upon ourselves in the name of decency and respect for others.

“O beautiful for heroes proved in liberating strife,/Who more than self their country loved,/And mercy more than life!” Most Americans cherish the self-sacrifice that members of our Armed Forces make to protect us and keep us free. What jumps out at me in the lyrics above is the value placed on mercy. We are a tough, individualistic culture. We value hard work and self-determination. But sometimes we forget to have compassion for those less fortunate. We fail to understand that even in America, everyone does not have equal access to the American Dream.

“O Beautiful for patriot dream/That sees beyond the years.” Unfortunately, living for tomorrow is not our strong suit in America. We look for instant gratification, get rich quick schemes, and creature comforts for now. We seek the easiest path without looking at the long-term consequences. This is especially apparent in the way we approach environmental issues. Our leaders would do well to “see beyond the years” when forming public policy. As Americans, we can forgo some present pleasures for future security.

“And crown thy good with brotherhood/From sea to shining sea.” There is so much packed into this iconic line. Our concern for our fellow human beings is not what it should be and what we as a nation have been known for in the past. I think about the government of France reaching across the ocean with the beautiful gift of the Statue of Liberty, as a token of its admiration for American heart and generosity. But here within our borders, there are hatred and prejudice, selfishness and greed. Our sense of brother (and sister) hood is lacking.

The words “from sea to shining sea” struck me with special resonance after this last presidential election. There was so much pitting of urban elites against ordinary rural citizens, liberals on the coasts against seemingly more humble Middle Americans.  The fact is that our American values apply to all of us, rich and poor, educated and uneducated, rural, urban, suburban, black, white, brown – the list is endless.

This week as we bask in our Independence, let’s take to heart the words of the song and work to make this truly America, the beautiful.